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Written by Kyla Salisbury, Published on October 16, 2018

Stress is a physical or psychological factor that causes tension in the body. Anxiety is emotions or behaviors produced by perceived threat. Both are all too common symptoms of this fast paced, high expectation society in which we live. Common universal stressors in the United States today include money, family, work, health, traffic . . . the list goes on. Anxiety can be an intermittent feeling of nervousness or worry, or it can be a diagnosable disorder defined by a state of excessive uneasiness and/or apprehension. Historically, stress and anxiety were protective responses to promote survival. Too much stress and anxiety can actually have a negative impact on our health and bodies.

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Topics:anxietyClinicalmindfulnesspatient educationpatientsquality of life

Written by Brittany Ferri, MS, OTR/L, CCTP, CLT, Published on September 18, 2018

Day after day, I look forward to meeting one particular OT patient, who consistently gives me words of wisdom in such a way that I always smile and laugh. Being so quick-witted in spite of her circumstances is a fantastic quality of hers and it shows in her entire demeanor. One day, it made me think — I am constantly receiving good pieces of advice and hearing wonderful things from many of my patients, but why should I be the only one who benefits from them? It made me want to share the advice I’ve received with other therapists who may be in need of it.

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Topics:Clinicalcommunicationpatient educationpatientstips for new grads

Written by Shilah Todd, Published on April 19, 2018

We all learned intervention ideas in occupational therapy school. We heard all the research. But once you get into practice, being occupation-based is a little harder to achieve with productivity standards, patient diagnoses, and different settings we may be working in. I’ll be discussing how I’ve been able to achieve occupation-based practice with one population in an acute care setting in hopes that you can carry these ideas over into your own different areas of practice!

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Topics:Clinicalinterdisciplinaryoccupation-based therapypatientstotal hip replacementtotal knee replacement

Written by Denae Asel-Templin MS, OTR/L, Published on March 20, 2018

So you’ve passed the NBCOT and can officially claim your “OTR” title. Now you are faced with the challenge of deciding upon a setting to work in — a task that can be overwhelming in and of itself. As a new grad, I thought I was going to work in the outpatient or acute care setting because that’s primarily where my experience was.

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Topics:burnoutCareershome healthpatientstips for new grads

Written by Shannen Marie Coley OTR/L, Published on February 6, 2018

So you’re thinking about becoming an acute inpatient rehab OT?

Newly graduated, in the midst of studying for the NBCOT, and on the pursuit of applying for a plethora of OT jobs: sound familiar? There are so many settings from which to choose: outpatient ortho, home health, acute inpatient rehab . . . the list goes on.

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Topics:acute careacute inpatient rehabapplying to OT jobsARUCareersFirst JobIRFpatientsRehabself-caresettings

Written by Kyla Salisbury, Published on November 1, 2017

OT outcome measures are crucial to your clinical success.

Measuring outcomes is a very important part of occupational therapy practice. OT outcome measures are used to determine value and effectiveness of treatment in therapy. These measures are often completed at the start of therapy to determine baseline function and then again, at the end of therapy to assess progress and determine treatment efficacy.

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Topics:ClinicalOT outcome meauresot schoolpatientsResearch

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